Brunnen graben

Grabe einen Brunnen, ehe du durstig bist. 

– Chinesische Weisheit  

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„…..On this particular day in the gym, there was a coach visiting who had worked with thousands of athletes over his long career, including some nationally-ranked athletes and Olympians.
I had just finished my workout when I asked him, “What’s the difference between the best athletes and everyone else. What do the really successful people do that most people don’t?”
He briefly mentioned the things that you might expect. Genetics. Luck. Talent.
But then he said something I wasn’t expecting.
“At some point,” he said, “it comes down to who can handle the boredom of training every day and doing the same lifts over and over and over again.”
That piece of advice surprised me because it’s a different way of thinking about work ethic.
Most of the time people talk about getting motivated and “amped up” to work on their goals. Whether it’s business or sports or art, you will commonly hear people say things like, “it all comes down to having enough passion.”
As a result, I think many people get depressed when they lose focus or motivation because they think that successful people have some unstoppable passion and willpower that they seem to be missing. But that’s exactly the opposite of what this coach was saying.
Instead, he was saying that really successful people feel the same boredom and the same lack of motivation that everyone else feels. They don’t have some magic pill that makes them feel ready and inspired every day. But the difference is that the people who stick with their goals don’t let their emotions determine their actions. Top performers still find a way to show up, to work through the boredom, and to embrace the daily practice that is required to achieve their goals.
According to him, it’s this ability to do the work when it’s not easy that separates the top performers from everyone else. That’s the difference between professionals and amateurs……“

Quellehttps://jamesclear.com/stay-focused

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Slow gains

„…..Our society is obsessed with achievement. This is especially true in the gym.

I’m just as guilty of this as anyone else. Last week, a guy at my gym clean and jerked 325 pounds and made it look easy. My first question to him was, “What’s your max?”

I didn’t say, “How is your training going?” or “Have you been making progress recently?” but rather, “What is the absolute maximum weight you can do?”

My question was all about what he could achieve, not how he has progressed.

And you’ll find that mentality everywhere. Nobody is going to celebrate you for going up 1 pound per week. Everybody wants you to try for 10 more pounds right now.

Here’s the problem: a focus on achievement in the here and now usually comes at the expense of slower, more consistent progress. Achievement is so ingrained in our culture that we often ignore progress. (Of course, focusing on progress would ultimately lead to higher achievement, but it’s easy to dismiss that fact when you want to set a new PR today.)

I’m still learning to embrace this principle myself, but I’m getting better at it. And here’s what I’ve learned about training for slow progress rather than immediate achievement……….If you want to get in shape, to get stronger, and to reach your full potential, then what is the most important thing of all?

Answer: not missing workouts……“

 

Source: James Clear  / https://jamesclear.com/slow-gains 

 


 

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING
Master of Arts in Gesundheitsmanagement und Prävention
Triathlon-Trainer-B-Lizenz (Langdistanz)
Kontakt /Mail: info@aktiv-training.de

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